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Sheridan Curiosities Blog

Athletic Therapy students at the FIFA Women's Under 20 tournament

Since the time he was ten, Jordan Williams has been able to name off the anatomical terms for all of the bones in the human body. With an equally strong passion for baseball during his youth, it’s no surprise to anyone who knows him that he’s found his way to studying athletic therapy at Sheridan.

Williams arrived in the program with a kinesiology degree under his belt from the University of Lethbridge. He credits that experience with giving him the critical time management skills and solid study habits that have helped him keep pace with the program’s hectic schedule.

“We did everything from new patient assessments to starting the rehabilitation program the next time the patient would come in” – Jordan Williams

“Third year was the busiest by far,” Williams recalls. “We went to class from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. every day and spent the rest of our time placed with a sports team.” For Williams, that meant daily trips to Oshawa, where he supported the men’s soccer team at UOIT and the women’s basketball team at Durham College. It also meant a lot of studying on the bus and during down time between his commitments.

This past summer, Williams completed an internship at Sheridan’s Athletic Therapy, clocking 420 hours. “We did everything from new patient assessments to starting the rehabilitation program the next time the patient would come in.” There was also plenty of behind-the-scenes work like booking, billing, writing notes for patients, arranging referrals for X-rays or other imaging, and informing coaches of the progress of athletes who visited the clinic.

Another highlight for Williams was his volunteer work this summer as a stretcher-bearer for seven matches at the FIFA Under 20 Women’s World Cup in Toronto, an experience he shared with some of his classmates. “If there was an emergency, the referee first called the medical staff of that country’s team to come on the field. Then they’d call us if they needed help to load up and carry a player safely off the field.” Williams watched Ghana, Finland, Canada, New Zealand, Mexico and North and South Korea play, recalling that it was hard to remain neutral and keep an eye on the field for the potential to leap to action when Canada was on the pitch.

“My dream job would be to move back to BC where I am from and to work with a sports team as well as work in a clinic” – Jordan Williams

“Overall, it was a great opportunity to see how different teams work and how each team’s medical staff operates. I got a lot of practical insight into how complex it is to organize a large, international sporting event and how many people it involves from EMS to doctors in order to support the logistics.”

Now entering his fourth and final year of the program, Williams is looking forward to what his future holds. “My dream job would be to move back to BC where I am from and to work with a sports team as well as work in a clinic. That would combine the best of both worlds.” From providing immediate, on-field emergency care to helping athletes to regain their performance potential after repetitive strain, Williams looks forward to forging a satisfying career on the sidelines.


Pictured at top of page: Jordan Williams, Adam McLaughlin, Cailea Davis and Matthew Miller

Written by: Christine Szustaczek, Director of Communications and External Relations at Sheridan.

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